Case Study: University of Manitoba – Research + SmartPark

The University

Type: Suburban Campus

Winnipeg Neighborhoods(Winnipeg Maps)
Winnipeg Neighborhoods
(Winnipeg Maps)

University of Manitoba is a public university of the province of Manitoba. It is the largest institution in Manitoba and offers undergraduate and research based graduate study.

The current Campus of University of Manitoba consists of three locations: the main Fort Gary campus, the Bannatyne Campus (houses medical and dental department beside the health science center) and the William Norrie Centre for social work education.

The University also include the Ian N. Morrison Research Farm (406 acres) and Glenlea facility( 1,000 acres) near Carman for agricultural researches.

Founding Philosophy

UofM_1934
University of Manitoba 1934

The University of Manitoba was founded on April 8th, 1877, seven years after the creation of Province of Manitoba.

“When, therefore, Royal introduced the bill to create the University of Manitoba into’ the Provincial Legislature on April 8, 1877, the preamble declared that it was desirable “to establish one university for the whole of Manitoba.” That was the embodiment of Morris’ purpose. The preamble also said, however, that the university was to be “on the model of the University of London.” Section 10 provided that there were to be no professorships or other teacherships in the university.” (One University, 22)

The university is formed by joining three existing church college: St. Boniface College, St. John College and Manitoba College.

st john
St. John College and school 1884-1950.
The photograph is dated 1885.
Designed by Barber and Barber. Demolished in 1950s
(One University, 33)
(One University, 49)
(One University, 48)
(One University, 48)

St. Boniface College is the oldest among the three. It was found in 1854 and its form was taken from Lavel University of Quebec. Its education is in French and is focused on both philosophy and mathematics.

“The oldest of the colleges, St. Boniface, sprang from the mission school of Father Provencher; its tradition of scholarship and climate of instruction were derived from Laval University and the classical colleges of Quebec. The curriculum was classical, the philosophy scholastic. The atmosphere of the college was devoutly Catholic, the spirit Quebec-French, pious, merry and vigorous.”

St. John College was founded in 1866 and its education focus on mathematics following the Cambridge Tradition.

“St. John’s College, like St. Boniface, was a mission and cathedral college which continued the traditional alliance of education with religion. It had been begun in 1849 by the first Bishop of Rupert’s Land, Very Rev. David Anderson. After a lapse of a few years, It was re-established in I866 by Bishop Robert Machray, and it was Machray who gave it its character and tradition.”

Manitoba College was initiated in 1871. Its education focus on both philosophy and mathematics. It follows Queens University tradition and has great contribution on the university form.

“Manitoba College was founded to realize similar ideals. In 1869 advanced classes were first offered by Rev. John Black and Mr.David B. Whimster in Kildonan School, which was housed in “Nisbet Hall.”

The First University Building, on the Broadway sit,e 1901-1950
The First University Building, on the Broadway site 1901-1950

Later other colleges joined the affiliation including Wesley College, the Manitoba Medical College, the Manitoba College of Pharmacy,ect. Their teaching remains on their existing sites. Until the First building was erected in 1901.

The permanent site of the university was not decided till 1930.

(1912, Winnipeg Archive)
(1912, Winnipeg Archive)

The Fort Gary Site was designated for Manitoba Agriculture College. Later it became affiliation of the university.

The campus plan of the Agriculture college is based on a symmetrical grid where the horseshoe-shaped land was divided into rectangular parcels. The college occupies the most center parcels and the most important administration building was placed on the central axis.

A grand avenue is connecting the administration building and the city. Four college buildings surround the admin buildings on each corner. The residential hall is located on the south wing of the land. Other agricultural facilities are taking the land adjacent to the riverbank. This layout emphasized on the centrality of the administration building which represent the highest power of the college system.

Manitoba University Preliminary Plan, 1913(Winnipeg Archive)
Manitoba University Preliminary Plan, 1913
(Winnipeg Archive)

In 1913 as one of the site option The Olmsted Brothers designed the campus plan for the Manitoba University. It adapted the existing grid layout of the Agriculture college and introduced courtyard type arrangement to the parcel of administration building.

Manitoba Agriculture College Campus Plan, 1914(Winnipeg Archive)
Manitoba Agriculture College Campus Plan, 1914
(Winnipeg Archive)
(One University, 176)
(One University, 176)
Tache Hall 1949(Winnipeg Archive)
Tache Hall 1949
(Winnipeg Archive)

Tache Hall was transfered into School for Navigations during the World War II. It is restored to residence of university in 1945.

University of Manitoba Campus Plan, 1955(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba Campus Plan, 1955
(Winnipeg Archive)

In 1930s the Science building (Buller, North to Admin building) and Arts Building (Tier, Southeast corner of the Admin building) were built. In 1950s The downtown undergraduate students were relocated into the Fort Gary campus thus many services and buildings was developed. Such as Dafoe Library (East of Admin) and university athletic building (further northeast corner of admin).

University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1950(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1950
(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1950(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1950
(Winnipeg Archive)
Growth Comparison, 1914
Growth Comparison, 1914
Growth Comparison, 1955
Growth Comparison, 1955
University of Manitoba Development Birds Eye View, 1938 (The Saunderson Years, 216)
University of Manitoba Development
Birds Eye View, 1938
(The Saunderson Years, 216)
University of Manitoba Development Birds Eye View, 1970 (The Saunderson Years, 217)
University of Manitoba Development
Birds Eye View, 1970
(The Saunderson Years, 217)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1964(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1964
(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1975(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba, Birds Eye View, 1975
(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba Campus Plan, 1986(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba Campus Plan, 1986
(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba Building Index, 1984(Winnipeg Archive)
University of Manitoba Building Index, 1984
(Winnipeg Archive)

Samples of Campus Architecture:

University Center (Winnipeg Architecture, 51 )
University Center
(Winnipeg Architecture, 51 )
University Center (Winnipeg Architecture, 51)
University Center
(Winnipeg Architecture, 51)
John A. Russell Building
John A. Russell Building – Faculty of Architecture

Reference:

Thompson, William Paul, and Henry Kalen. Winnipeg Architecture: 100 Years. Winnipeg: Queenston House, 1975. Print.

Graham, John W. Winnipeg Architecture; the Red River Settlement, 1831-1960,. Winnepeg: University of Manitoba, 1960. Print.

Morton, W. L. One University; a History of the University of Manitoba, 1877-1952.[Toronto]: McClelland and Stewart, 1957. Print.

Winnipeg Archive: http://www.flickr.com/photos/manitobamaps/collections/7

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